During the 1960s Moore devoted increasing time and energy to investigating new structural concepts.  Building models based on tensional integrity, or tensegrity, where basically tension and compression are balanced in a series of rods and anchored cables, he pursued the idea of integrating this system with lightweight concrete to produce practical structures.  He produced folded-plate roofs using thinshell concrete, and he successfully produced the design of concrete modular homes for low-cost housing, which led to an invitation from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development to initiate and oversee a national low-income housing program.  He declined to leave Colorado for D.C., and continued his work with structural concrete in Denver.  For a few years early in the 1960s, Tom was also a visiting instructor in design at the University of Colorado School of Architecture in Boulder.

By 1960 Tom had developed what became known as the dogbone segment of dome construction.  Made of precast reinforced concrete, the dogbone was placed in series to form a geodesic dome that had the strength and durability of concrete while the entire system produced a lightweight structure.

By the end of 1960, construction on a fraternity house for the Denver University chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha was under way, and in 1961 Tom built a residence for his friend Harry Combs and wife Ginny (Tom’s first cousin), at Combs’s Sleeping Indian Ranch at Ridgway, Colorado.

In the following years, after designing a large addition for the Pat and Carla Coleman residence in Denver, Moore developed two designs for large prestressed concrete churches in the Denver area—the Englewood Methodist Church and the Edgewater Methodist Church — and he redesigned the Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Offices for another Denver architect.

While continuing his personal exploration of modern design, Moore also served as associate architect with the Denver-based Ken R White Company until his death in 1970.  His last project was a new home for his younger brother Richard and wife Zinnie at Starwood, Aspen.

Bucky Fuller and Tom holding dogbone segment, finished prototype in background.

Dogbone Dome, Denver – 1960

The dogbone was placed in series to form a geodesic dome that had the strength and durability of concrete while the entire system produced a lightweight structure.

Completed fraternity house, its dogbone construction hidden by solid surface.

Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity House at Denver University – 1960

By the end of 1960, construction on a fraternity house for the Denver University chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha was under way. It would be the first functional application of the dogbone dome. It was an extreme disappointment for Tom when city building inspectors, who had no experience with a structure of this design and engineering, insisted that the dome’s surface be uniform and whole. Moore gave his patent for the dogbone to Bucky Fuller and moved on to other projects. The city did allow Moore’s barrel-shell construction for the fraternity house’s living quarters.

Englewood Methodist Church in 2011.

Englewood Methodist Church, Englewood – 1965

Englewood Methodist Church on South Acoma St. in 2011.

Edgewater Methodist building, 2012.

Edgewater Methodist Church, Edgewater – 1965

Impressed with the new church in Englewood, the board and congregation of the Edgewater Methodist Church retained Moore to design their new church. It was similar in design and proposed production methods, but the decision was taken to have it faced with brick.

Mutual Benefit Life Insurance facing Speer Blvd.

Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Offices, Denver – 1966

When the original architect for this office complex was unable to fulfill the space requirements of the occupant at this irregular lot on Speer Blvd, Moore redesigned the entire building.

Richard and Zinnie Moore residence, Starwood, Aspen.

Richard Moore Residence, Aspen – 1970

In 1969 Moore completed the design of one of his last projects, a residence for his younger brother Richard, in Starwood at Aspen. Completed in 1970, this home was affectionately called the Trainwreck among the family, for it stretched across the hillside, so that every room had a view across the valley to the Elk Mountains and Aspen Ski Areas.